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Implanon

sex; contraception; Implanon; implant; hormones; STIs; intercourse; protection; hormone; contraceptive; implants; inplants;

Contents

The contraceptive implant is a thin plastic rod that is placed under the skin of the inner upper arm to stop pregnancy. The brand available in Australia is called Implanon. It constantly releases small amounts of a hormone called progestogen into the body. The implant suits most women including young women and breastfeeding women. It is relatively safe for heavy smokers and people with diabetes.

Implanon is very effective in stopping pregnancy. Fewer than 1 in 1,000 women will become pregnant while using Implanon when it has been correctly inserted. The implant should be replaced with a new one every three years.

The contraceptive implant does not protect against sexually transmitted infections (STIs).

You need to go to your doctor to discuss whether this form of contraception suits you, and to get a prescription for it. Then the implant needs to be inserted by a doctor who has been specially trained.

For information about the contraceptive implant have a look at SHine SA 'Contraceptive implant (Implanon)'.

Resources

South Australia

Information in languages other than English

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The information on this site should not be used as an alternative to professional care. If you have a particular problem, see a doctor, or ring the Youth Healthline on 1300 13 17 19 (local call cost from anywhere in South Australia).
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